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approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
be a lie. >> got my attention. priceless memories, firsthand witnesses to march on washington gathered in d.c. for a special celebration. we are going to take you there. >> first honoring the best of the best, '72 dolphins get their white house moment. only taken 37 years. 7:09, we'll be right back. ask me what it's like to get your best night's sleep every night. [announcer] why not talk to someone who's sleeping on the most highly recommended d in america? ask me about my tempur-pedic. ask me how fast i fall asleep. ask me about staying asleep. [announcer] tempur-pedic owners are more satisfied than owners of any traditional mattress brand. tempur-pedic. the most highly recommended bed in america. buy a tempur-pedic mattress set and get a free twin tempur-simplicity mattress. find a store near you at tempurpedic.com. ♪ turn around ♪ every now and then i get a little bit hungry ♪ ♪ and there's nothing good for me around ♪ ♪ turn around ♪ every now and then i get a little bit tired ♪ ♪ of craving something that i can't have ♪ ♪ turn around barbara ♪ i finally found t
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, journal@c-span.org. at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
on an airline in honolulu and flew to washington, d.c., and lands at dulles and actually gets an audience, let's say, peter king, or dianne feinstein. how do we think he would have been received if he had a private audience? we have seen how they reacted, they spin the truth, he would have been buried and we would have never known the truth. >> i know you haven't been in direct contact with your son, but what do you know about his condition right now? >> i'll say that having spoken with his russian attorney, he said he's safe. he obviously is exhausted. but he's now needing a period of time where he can recoup his energy level and reflect on what he wishes to do going forward. that's from his attorney. we hope to meet with him very soon, with edward in the next weeks. >> good luck. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> and the chairs of the foreign affairs committee, robert menendez, democrat, and republican congressman ed royce, the chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. senator, let me begin with you, you heard this from lon snowden, and his attorney, they don't believe that ed
. this is the "full court press" coming to you live on current tv from our studio on capitol hill in washington, d.c. good to see you this morning and good to have you with us and welcome to washington and the summer in washington where it's kind of a ghost town with the congress out of town and the president out of town. he spent the night in los angeles. he will be down at camp pendleton later this afternoon. we will bring you up to date on the news of the day and take your calls at 1-866-55-press. look forward to hearing from you on twitter at bpshow and on facebook at facebook.com/billpressshow. in the news today, of course, everybody still buzzing about the fact that "the washington post" was sold. could "the new york times" be next? that's what people are asking. and around washington, the most common reaction is well, jeff bezos bought it, at least it wasn't rupert murdoch or the koch brothers. good news on the child obesity front. give some credit to first lady michelle obama. pardon me. oh, my god, i don't think i've ever done that on television before but for the first time ever -- not e
. getting ready for the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, "the new york times" website today posted that paper's original coverage, their coverage in the paper from the day that the march happened, back in 1963. and, of course, what's funny about the coverage, looking back on it now. funny/creepy/funny/creepy is how obsessed "the times" was and ow obsessed all of the mainstream media was. how relevant it felt to point out over and over again how nice the whole thing was. this emphasis is out of control. "it was an orderly washington rally." "the leaders of march called on congress with courtesy." "congress responded cordially." "it was an occupying army of marchers on washington, but it was polite." "politeness is the order of the day." "even the traffic control worked smoothly." "disorders were at a minimum." "only four arrested, including a nazi." oh, see, only the nazis were getting arrested. that was a fine day for a walk to the national mall. it is sometimes easier to see in history than it is up close while stuff is happening. but tactics matter in politics. strategy ma
in washington, he started as a reporter's reporter. about how he likes we like to describe. he is a third-generation newsman. down at the under the table is alex mueller, who gives us a different perspective. he gives us a graphic perspective and he has background in graphic design and journalism. both were rollcall and for the hill. we have experienced much of the industry. those are our panelists. we are very happy to have all of them here. , i am not going to make any kind of presentation. but we would just like to throw out some questions, to jump and come an analyst at jumping in with each other and we will talk about whatever you want to talk about. i would like to ask the panelist to talk about how you do things differently so how is this effective in communicating politics? >> i would like to say that we threw out the mold in terms of stories when we created politifact. we thought that the inverted term and was not going to be the way that they had a whole different form of journalism. it was something where the information was communicated both through an individual and fact chec
to call them out. unacceptable is how washington continues to screw the middle class over. cenk off air>>> i don't want the middle class taking the brunt of the spending cuts and all the different programs that wind up hurting the middle class. cenk on air>>> you got to go to the local level, the state level and we have to fight hard to make sure they can't buy our politics anymore. cenk off air>>> and they can question if i'm right about that. but i think the audience gets that, i actually mean it. cenk on air>>> 3 trillion dollars in spending cuts! narrator>>> uniquely progressive and always topical, the worlds largest online news show is on current tv. cenk off air>>> and i think the audience gets, "this guys to best of his abilities is trying to look out for us." only on current tv! [♪ theme music ] >> announcer: broadcasting across the nation, on your radio, and on current tv, this is the "bill press show." >> bill: the department of justice says no, no, no to the planned merger between american airlines and usair. is this good for consumers? good morning, everybody. what do you
at the national press club in washington, d.c. he addressed a voter id laws and the feature of the republican party. this is about one hour. >> our speaker today is benjamin jealous,who at 35 became the youngest president and ceo of the national association for the advancement of colored people. a mixed race kid from california, jealous grew up in a family always challenged by the issue of race. according to an interview in "essence" magazine, his grandparents faced obstacles dating back to slavery. his mother helped desegregate her high school in baltimore, and joined sit-ins at lunch counters in virginia. his father told him what it was like to be the lone white guy at a lunch counter sit-in and getting worked over by the police, who saw him as a race traitor. as a kid, mr. jealous recalls being at a discount store with a black friend, and noticing a white lady peeking at them through the pegboard to make sure they were not stealing anything. he has led advocacy, but he could, at one time, qualify for mentorship at the national press club. reliable reports say he once tried his hand at inve
. to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. i am proud to stand before you as the first african-american, first woman city administrator. >> [applause] >>thank you. i i am grateful to be inspired and mentored by many great civil rights leaders and my educational leaders which includes usf law school. >> [applause] >> and my family members who have mentored me and have paved the way for me along my career path. i could not have gotten there without them. my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i my greatest inspirations are my parents william little and maria little, and i want to talk about howthey were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin they were inspired by the march on washington and dr. king's speech which subsequently has passed on to me. my mother was among the 200,000 people who joined dr. martin luther king on the march on washington 50 years ago and stood up for the rights for freedom.as a teenager gro
que esta pasando en las grandes ligas. aqui en washington, el emergente venezolano hÉctor sÁnchez le dio una voltereta sorpresiva a la pizarra con un jonrÓn de tres carreras en el noveno inning para que los gigantes de san francisco hundieran ayer 4-3 a los nacionales. cuando sÓlo le quedaba un strike de vida y habÍa dos outs, sÁnchez conectÓ su bambinazo ante el cerrador dominicano rafael soriano de los nacionales. la derrota rompiÓ la racha de cinco victorias de washington y echÓ a perder el esfuerzo de dan haren en seis innings, en los que sÓlo permitio una carrera. a nivel local maÑana a partir de las 4 de la tarde en herdon virginia estan programados los partidos de cuartos de final ida del torneo avianca- univision. tenemos impresiones de jugadores. esta noche en nuestra segunda entrega tendremos la previa completa para el fin de semana los esperamos solo a las once en vivo. como cada viernes fanny gutierrez nos presenta las actividades del entretenimiento... volvemos con ella... comienzan esta noche misma noche... que por cierto tiene sabor a salsa... dos grandes de l
washington journal for august the third. potential attacks by al qaeda has part of the state department to issue a worldwide alert for travelers. the attacks may occur before the end of august with north africa and the middle east been the focus of that threat. wall street journal reporting that a bill is being proposed that would double the amount of guest worker visas. turning to the economy, the unemployment figure is at 7.4% with 162,000 jobs created in august. that is the economy nationwide. we want to get your take on the economy. is it getting better or worse yet go and how much washington how -- or worse yet go and how much does washington -- influence does washington have. again, for our first 45 minutes on the to get your take economy. you can call us on those lines. if you want to reach out to us on social media, twitter @ cspanwj. on facebook we have about 13 comments. you can always send us an e-mail at journal@c-span.org. here are the figures from the front page of the wall street journal -- it also talks about the unemployment figure, standing at 7.4%. that is
. programs on every first lady from martha washington wine mckinley. tonight, harriet lane. quite she is probably the most tragic of all the first ladies. she hated it with a passion. she did not move into the white house with peace. >> they had eight rooms they had to furnish. when she arrived, she basically holed up and spent much of her time writing letters to her dead son. she called them my presaged child. a very poignant letter. , andey were returning there was a terrible accident. . it was devastating for the family. god.she concluded this was forhe house was too much jane to take care of. i don't think she was interested in housekeeping particularly. >> most regarded peer us as a failure in the office. >> it was the happiest of all presidencies. >> good evening. on this program, we learned about the final first ladies of the antebellum era. whose tenurepierce was defined by overwhelming loss. the time she and her husband are brought to the executive mansion, they have lost all fore of their young sons the next 45 minutes, we will .elve into jane pierce good evening. welcome. >
bought and sold in washington. i'm sorry, what are you saying? >> ok. >> the democracy is bought and sold in washington. this is not the idea of democracy that brought me to the united states. i came from another country where there was a dictatorship, i was expecting ideal democracy where one person and one vote was -- host: where are you from originally? >> cameroon. >> my daughter was snatched from the street not because she was doing anything wrong simply because she stopped ask directions from a cop that doesn't understand french and she doesn't understand english, and because of that she has been in a mental substitution for eight years. i've done my best, everything i could to get out and she can't get out. from france where she came from and now she can't go back to france. the immigration will not deport her to anywhere. so i don't know what else anybody can do in this country to have the right justice, t take you can't jus anybody from the streets or your house. host: angie from scombrooksville, florida. -- from jacksonville, florida. good morning, you're from our independent l
>>> economic sabotage, let's play "hardball." >>> good evening, i'm chris matthews. in washington, there's news tonight that some on the american right are plotting the global explosion of a default on the u.s. national debt this fall. the plot is to tie the regular vote to extend the debt ceiling to the obliteration of the affordable care act. according to the plans leaked to right-leaning news organizations, any measure to finance the health care act would detonate a refusal to make good on american debt. the first time this has happened in the country's history. and the repercussions could explode the economic order. do the leaders of the republican party tend to go this far? dare to sabotage the american economy and much of the world economy in order to defund a program, the affordable care act which is the law of the land? and will they go to this drastic extreme to intimidate the u.s. congress or the president or both? if so, is this the extreme case where it trumps the most minimal loyalty to the common national interests where anything goes, where the ends justify whatever
, the search for suspected killer turns now to idaho. we'll be talking to washington state police for the latest on the manhunt from their perspective. vo: at meineke we know that oil is the lifeblood of every car. remember to change it on schedule to keep your car healthy. show your car a little love with an oil change starting at $19.95. >>> the hunt for james dimaggio and his alleged kidnapping victim hannah anderson has turned to a vast wilderness area in idaho. >> roads into the area are being blocked off as police hunt for the pair, and a few minutes ago we spoke with sergeant jason hicks with the washington state patrol to learn the latest on the search. >> there is an investigative crew on ground in idaho. we here in washington in cooperation with the oregon state police have kept the amber alert in effect hoping for new information from the investigative team in idaho to kind of point us in the direction that we need to go in order to assist them in any way we need to. >> but you don't necessarily -- i mean, are you being extra vigilant in your area? obviously not. the id
why washington works so badly for the rest of the country, the book explains that it works extremely well for its most important citizens, the lobbyists. the permanent government of the united states is no longer defined by party or branch of government, but rather by a profession that has comfortably encamped around the federal coffers. the result, according to many measures, is that washington has become the wealthiest city in the united states. leibovich describes a city in which money has trumped power as the ultimate currency. lobbyists hold the keys to what everyone in government, senator or staffer is secretly searching for, a post-government income. in 1974 only 3% of retiring members of congress became lobbyists. today that number is 42% for members of the house and 50% for senators. the result is bad legislation. look at any bill today and it is a gargantuan document filled with thousands of giveaways. the act that dree atd the federal reserve in 1913 was only 31 pages home. the 1933 glass steeg al legislation was only 37 pages long. the dodd-frank bill is 848 pages plus th
. i'm candy crowley in washington. >>> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a great show for you today. first up, the end of the american dream. can americans make it no matter where they start from? a blockbuster new study gives us the answers, and we will delve into them. >>> then, imagine an iranian president who thinks nuclear weapons are a waste of resources. well, exactly such a person assumed iran's top elected job this week. we will talk to people who know president rouhani. >>> later the prince of saudi arabia sounds the alarm about his country's future. can saudi arabia endure? >>> and finally, how to make a hamburger without killing a cow, and why it might save the world. >>> but first here's my take. the hottest political book of the summer, "this town" by mark leibovich is a vivid detailed picture of the country's rule elite filled with fake friendships and sensationalist media. beneath the juicy anecdotes is a depressing message about corruption and dysfunction. if you're try
. technically, washington is not withholding aid, since they have until the end of the fiscal year, september 30th, to distribute it. speaking of money in washington, the sequester is still haunting all of us. it's the sequester wheel of misfortunate. i know you guys have missed this. six months after its first appearance, we are still calling it sequester savagery. let's be honest, not a lot has chan changed. everyone figured the sequester will never happen. it's just too terrible. but they figured wrong. while the first $85 billion in across the board spending cuts are already happening, the remaining $1.1 trillion in cuts will be with us over the next decade unless congress acts to restore the cash. the next round starts in just six weeks. 650,000 civilian government workers are furloughed this summer. the pentagon's facing $52 billion in additional cuts starting this fall. 57,000 low-income school children are being cut from head start programs. federal judges are warning the cuts are putting public safety at risk. get this, bunnies, yes, even furry bunnies used in government-backed lab test
in washington and one time i asked him what he used as his coffee table and i said stanley, what you haven't met him and he said, nude pictures. years later when his family died, i dropped the subject ends are you years later he left his archives and they deliberately delivered the marine corps locker to my house and my husband said, what is in there. and i said nude photos. and he said, come on, let's open it, and i said no, i don't want to remember stanley that way. he said we have to openness, stanley was a great photographer. and we argued about it for a while. then we opened it. it was not nude photographs at all, it was the most sentimental store of kennedy photographs and artifacts and letters and handwritten notes from the president himself and the first lady. anyway, i'm going to show you some of them. i'm going to tell you about them. but because this was the 50th anniversary of the kennedy administration, and because stanley had left me these photographs from i really wanted to share them and i just didn't want to donate them, you know, to a library where they would fit in dust and pe
washington, d.c.. this is so refreshing because often we just hear about the policy all day. and it feels -- it's important. i'm not going to put your brother's work down. but we love -- we need to get back to connect and come back to the human heart part of that. i'm learning as an educator the and portents of empathy. and how do you instill that and others who maybe don't want to connect? >> a lot of what i do as an educator is about building empathy. so we will do things like rather than simply having the facts of the civil war for instance. it's important to building narrative and there are some things that perhaps i'm not saying everything is relative, but what we do is take a picture and build a life where it was an important time and was a document of war and amazing photograph of the war. so i have my students buying the picture and begin to tell the war from the perspective of someone that hasn't been featured in the textbook. and so they will have to imagine what is this person's greatest fear or desire? what does this person eat for breakfast? so you begin to sort of build flas
made in washington and agreed by the government here, then that's really why we're here, because washington feels there should be some bombs falling this weekend. now, many atrocities have taken place in the last two years since the conflict began. shirley, those seeking to take military action could wait a few days longer to assure that the facts are straight but it's obvious there's no threats to this journey of the uk that we know that the government seeks military action in order to deter and undermines chemical weapons, that's fine. that it may well see, that's fine, although military action has to be sanctioned by law. but surely, it should wait until the full conclusive proof is available their fight by the >> that has descended the civil war. the recent spill regarding militant objection has been confusing. last friday at united states and the uk governments were pressing for weapons inspectors to be allowed in c. on monday the inspector general's went albeit in difficult circumstances but on monday evening all indications were that the u.s. and uk had made up their minds
and recommitment as tens of thousands of people are gathering in washington, d.c., this morning, just as they did 50 years ago this week when martin luther king jr. delivered one of the most moving and best remembered speeches in american history. labor and civil rights groups are among the 100,000 people who will participate in today's march led by the reverend martin luther king iii and one of the featured speakers will be john lewis. back in 1963 he was the leader of the student nonviolating committee. nancy pelosi will also be speaking today along with the families of trayvon martin and emmett till. we'll all get under way later this morning and checking in and bringing you the latest proceedings throughout the day. the panel here in new york. amanda turkal for huffingtonpost.com, evan white house reporter for buzzfeed.com and liz winstead co-creator of "daily show" and author of the book. thank you for joining us. seems like the entire political world is in washington, d.c., glad we could see some people up here. i guess i just sort of start with your thoughts, amanda aama about 50 years lat
on the "washington journal." later withk about it two members of congress. here is the front page of the morning --imes" this rifts latecomer suspending impasse. host: representative steny hoyer of maryland, the number two house democrat host: this is how the "new york times" concludes its front page article -- host: that again it's from the "new york times." here is the "wall street journal" specifically on a spending bill issue that came up this week. senate spending bill blocked host: well, we want to get your views on the federal budget and the process as the congress gets ready to recess. they are in today, and after that, five weeks off. the federal budget is uncertain as congress recesses. for republicans, (202) 585-3880 for democrats, and (202) 585-3882 for independents. you can also contact us through social media, @cspanwj is our twitter and appeared you consider e-mail if you'd like to journal@c-span.org. "hill" newhe'll" -- savor this morning host: that is from the "hill" newspaper. and from "politico" this morning -- john boehner calls for a short-term continuing resolution. here's
washington post and had a hmm ton. enough already. is that a good headline? >> i think so. what was the -- geoff and i who are opposite of people obviously can be. are annoyed of watching anywhere in washington on anything. and our boys who runs "fortune" since there wasn't going to be resembling -- he would commission the people to propose solutions to we sat down and wrote it. >> host: how did you go about it? >> guest: it was pretty simple. we decided the smart thing get off the premises. two of us went a couple of blocks down six avenue new york had lunch by ourselves. we went through the big issues here and we found that, you know even though we don't agree, as alan said, we come from opposite perspectives here. we were able, in a short time to reach general agreement on a few principles that were the biggest and most important ones. you know, the larger point here is that within washington, and look, a lot of people know it. at love people don't. within washington, there's broad agreement what the financ
. "washington journal" is next. >> our concern with the cause of the defenseless people of syria is a bout choices that will directly affect our goal in the world and our interests in the world. it is also profoundly about who we are. >> secretary of state kerry making the case for potential military strikes in syria as a response for the use of chemical weapons. president obama also speaking yesterday, saying he is still waiting operation -- us bill weighing options -- still weighing options. we want to hear from you about not only what was given, information wise, but if you are convinced by it. here is how you can weigh in this morning. republicans,for democrats,0 offor independents.or you can reach out to us on facebook, off of twitter, and at journal@c-span.org. it was a four-page document that was put out by the administration, showing some of the cases they are making as far as what they have found in syria. this is what was unclassified, not everything was put out there. you can also find this document at our website, c-span.org. a little bit from it -- also it says -- there is mor
negotiations in washington between the israelis and palestinians, that's diplomacy. and when president obama and russian president vladimir putin and the chinese president meet in st. petersburg, as i think they will in a couple of weeks to talk about economic global problems, well, that, too, is diplomacy. and when president bush and president obama negotiated one by one free trade agreements between the united states and colombia and panama, that's economic diplomacy. when nations meet to fight climate change and try to eradicate trafficking of women and children and try to fight global drug and crime cartels, that's multi-lateral diplomacy. and when we move tons -- hundreds and thousands of tons of food aid to poor country where people are starving, like north korea, that's humanitarian diplomacy. so diplomacy encompasses those thousands of actions taken each day by governments like ours, by international organizations like the u.n., by nonprofit organizations like the gates foundation, to connect, connect countries, connect regions, connect towns around the world, connect, most important
. so he warned washington about this, set i can hardly see how we can win the hearts and minds of the iranians when we are starving them to death. we should try to find a way to provide them with food aid during the war. one of the most curious diplomatic appointments was the man he ultimately chose to be america's first full-time minister to saudi arabia. prior to that the prime minister dep to double the in saudi arabia. we didn't send anyone to saudi arabia, colonel william any. this is an interesting story, he was a lieutenant colonel in the marine corps and was elected to the are ministered to saudi arabia because he spoke arabic and we didn't have a lot of arabic speakers in the american government so this was a great opportunity to send an arabic speaker to the middle east, didn't matter if he was a marine corps officer. let me give a shameless promotion to my book one more time, that famous picture of president roosevelt meeting the king of saudi arabia. the interpreter, you see in his marine corps uniform, we were a little hard pressed to find people who had expertise
and weakness. the latest on this troubling news this morning. good morning from washington, tuesday august 20th, 2013. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. lets get to the first read. we start overseas. former egyptian president hosni mubarak could actually be free in a few days. egyptian security forces arrested the spiritual leader of the muslim brotherhood, mohammed badie and his deputy, who was already in custody, will go on trial later this month for their alleged role of the death of protesters outside of headquarters in june. after scores of detention of top leaders, this morning the brotherhood has appoint add new figurehead. ousted president mohamed morsi remains under house arrest for a 49th day. this morning mubarak's lawyer tells nbc news his legal team is submitting a petition in court tomorrow requesting his release. they are 99% sure that he's actually going to be free even if just temporarily. nearly 1,000 egyptians died since security forces raided pro-morsi camps. on monday human rights watch called that crackdown, quote, the most serious incident of mass unlawful kill
from the national center for education statistics. "washington journal" is next. ♪ friday,ning, it is august 30, 2013. even as the british parliament voted not to join the u.s. in a possible strike. while administration officials said last night that the u.s. is considering taking unilateral action in response to a reported chemical weapons attack on syrian civilians and rebels last week, some congressional leaders said the white house has more work to do in making its case. as we take you through the latest developments this morning, we want to hear your opinion on what you think the american public needs to know before america -- before president obama takes action. give us a call on the republican democrats, and independents, the numbers are listed on the screen. if you are outside the u.s., it 585-3883. you can also catch us on twitter and facebook or e-mail us. a very good friday morning to you. i want to take you right to the headlines about syria and possible u.s. involvement today. here's the front page of "the new york times." to one of those british newspapers, "
goodman in your first book "the exception to the rulers" you right and we we are quoting the "washington post" here that amy goodman is the journalist as uninvited guests. >> guest: we are not supposed to be a party to any party. we are journalists. there is a reason why our profession journalism is the only one explicitly protected by the u.s. constitution. we are supposed to be the check and balance on power. >> host: in-app look also war and peace, life and death. that is the role of the media in a democratic society to provide a forum for this discourse to do anything less is a disservice to the servicemen and service women of this country. >> guest: that's right. you know i had just flown in from denver where is that they national conference on media reform and when we flew into the airport at denver airport where people hold up signs when you come out to pick you up. as we were walking there were some soldiers there. they were going to be picking up the general and as we walked by they were waiting. i thought maybe the journalist behind me could see the sign for the general. we wen
. >> thank you. >>> amazon's founder makes a big purchase. he pays $250 million for the washington post. could this help the newspaper business survive? up next. you really couldn't have come at a better time. these chevys are moving fast. i'll take that malibu. yeah excuse me, the equinox in atlantis blue is mine! i was here first, it's mine. i called about that one, it's mine. mine! mine. it's mine. it's mine. mine. mine. mine. mine. it's mine! no it's not, it's mine! better get going, it's chevy model year-end event. [ male announcer ] the chevy model year-end event. the 13s are going fast, time to get yours. right now, get this great lease on a 2013 chevy cruse ls for around $149 a month. vo:remember to changew that oil is the it on schedule toy car. keep your car healthy. show your car a little love with an oil change starting at $19.95. we replaced people with a machine.r, what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. >>
with jack nicholson and nominated for an academy award. >> let's talk about washington now. more of the same mess at the irs. brand new testimony revealing the embattled agency is still targeting conservative groups. after all of the attention. peter doocy is live for us in washington. what's this all about. >> they would no longer be scrutinizeed by the irs for their political beliefs. there's a new washington piece that contains a transcript between congressional investigator and irs agent. it is a tea party group in the political at cassie case even if no evidence of activity on the application. the irs agent said based on my current manager's direction uh-huh. back in may you remember president obama said he wasn't going to tolerate improper behavior at the irs. >> it doesn't matter what political side you are from. the irs has to operate with absolute integrity. the government has to conduct itself in the way that is true to the public for us that is especially true for the irs. >> they want to put lois lerner the head of the irs tax exception commission back on the stand. >> lois lerne
and the washington -- grand canyon and the washington monument and everything that what happened when we shut down government, the american people will react in a negative fashion and will blame congress. there are some of my colleagues in the hopkinson at that say we have to repeal obama care if we're going to raise the debt limit. my friends, that does not work. i want to repeal obamacare. it happens to be the way i voted, but it is not the way it will happen. we do not have 67 votes in the united states senate, which was what would be required to override a presidential veto. and so, i think it is not a right approach. what i do want to continue this repeal parts of obamacare, which are very onerous and are very harmful in my view to healthcare in america. i do not know what is going to happen, but i believe we will not shut down the government. i believe it is time the american people are heard they want us to sit down together and avoid what is turning into every year or every two years that we threatened people like you. it contributes -- i joke about the congress, but i am not proud of that
me, on current tv from our studio on capitol hill in washington, d.c. good to see you this morning and you know how it goes. we will tell you what's going on here in our nation's capital, around the country and around the globe and then we'll open up the phones for your calls at 1-866-55-press. on all of the stories of the day. we'll also look for your comments on twitter. welcome your comments on twitter at bp show and on facebook, become our friend if you're not already, facebook.com/billpressshow. lot going on. president obama coming up to capitol hill yesterday, meeting with house democrats and meeting with senate democrats. where he apparently got a lot of questions about the keystone pipeline and questions about rumors he might consider appointing larry summers, former treasury secretary under bill clinton, appointing larry summers to be the new head of the fed. a lot of members of congress unhappy with that prospect because they had such a terrible time with larry summers when he was treasury secretary. also, on the hill, the nsa came underfire in the senate judiciary commit
talking with marc mauer and richard vigueire, thank you for your time. >> on the next "washington journal," discussion about the political unrest in egypt with jon alterman of the center for strategic and international studies. then taxpayers for common sense vice president stephen ellis talks about the national flood insurance program and how a new law is causing rates to rise. after that, we look at how social media might be used to help predict the outcome of u.s. house elections with indiana university professor five io -- fabio rohas. your calls, tweets, and e-mails along with calls beginning live at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c- span. ," ours weeks "newsmakers guest is the ceo of heritage action for america. he talks about his organization's agenda and its position on issues pertaining to health care and immigration. here's a preview. [video clip] >> in this environment right now, it is very difficult to handle immigration the way we should be. which is bypassing piecemeal pieces of legislation, getting the border secure. we also have a gigantic imbalance between labor supply
"hardball." >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews back in washington. in the news tonight, hillary clinton way ahead of schedule. suddenly it's as if she's the next president, even if barack obama is still president. but wait. wait a minute. it wasn't supposed to be like this. the hillary bandwagon wasn't set to rumble till after the 2014 elections, till the hillary forces were fully organized and ready to make their kick. why suddenly does it feel like she's in the driver's seat? well, people are either positioning themselves already for a role in hillary's government or acting to lock in positions they have with either her or the few people she would give authority to hire for her. why does it feel like the train has already left the station? what does this mean for the other side? if the republicans are also looking for jobs in 2016 and need to win to get those jobs, if they see her on the move already, does that mean they're more likely to push a candidate who actually has a good chance of boxing her out for the center? those people in the middle politically? in other words, new jersey
that ole party. just cruel. joining me now is congressman jim mcdermott, democrat from washington, and joan walsh, editor at large for salon.com. thank you both for coming on the show tonight. >> thanks, reverend al. >> good to be here. >> congressman, how can the gop justify putting politics before people like this? >> well, it's because they don't know what people feel, i guess. that's the only way i can explain it. because they're all talking about money and deficits and this kind of stuff. they're not looking at the people, like that little girl. if you look at people who are in the waiting room or in the emergency room and realize that they waited too long because they didn't have health insurance, you wish that they could have a health insurance system, and that's really what the president is offering to the country. we're not taking over the health care system in the government, we're offering people an opportunity to buy in to private health care plans at a cost that they can afford, and that's really taking away that anxiety is really what this is all about. but the republicans hav
in washington. there's news tonight that some on the american right are plotting the global explosion of a default on the u.s. national debt this fall. the plot is the to tie the regular vote to extend the debt skeel together obliteration of the affordable care act. according to the plans leaked to right leaning news organizations, any measure to finance the health care act would detonate refusal to make good on american debt, the first time this has happened in this country's history. the repercussions of which could explode the world economic order. do the leaders of the republican party intend to go this far? do they dare to sabotage the american economy and much of the world economy in order to defund a program, the affordable care act that is the law of the land? will they go to this drastic extreme to intimidate the u.s. congress or the president or both? and if so, is this the extreme case where ideological zealotry trumps even the most preliminarial loyalty to the common national interests where anything goes, where the ends justify whatever means there are to be had no matter
breaking in washington today, this caught many people far off guard that the news that the former president had a heart health scare. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: in office and out, george w. bush has been regarded by many as the most fit president ever. he took up mountain biking at the suggestion of his doctors and even though he's had cuts and bruises along the way, he's been pedaling of since. he now hosts an annual ride honoring wounded soldier covering 60 miles at a stretch through the texas countryside. >> for me it's one of the most uplifting experiences i've had in my adult life, probably my whole life. >> reporter: it's not just cycling. the former president has enjoyed running, swimming, golfing, weight lifting and hard labor on his ranch. his annual physicals while in office found him in excellent health with, quote no, history of hypertension or diabetes and with low to very low coronary artery disease risk. >> thank you so much for inviting our rowdy friends to my hanging. >> reporter: during the unveiling of his presidential portrait in may last year, he seemed healthy and happy as p
washington post." we are starting a partnership with kaiser health news exploring the health care law and what it means to you. let's hear from vince in minneapolis, was on medicaid.-- who is on medicaid. hi, vince. caller: hello. i wanted to go off of medicaid and suspend my social security payments because i want to go back to work to the bankruptcy court.because i still maintain my lawyer's license. i know from bankruptcy that there is a lot of people who filed a medical debts because of -- medical debts and it bankrupts them because of uninsured accidents. the aca does not address that at all. host: what happens to people who have had catastrophic medical situations, can't pay the bills, have to declare bankruptcy? can that still happen? guest: yeah, absolutely. the hope for those who support the act is that it will happen a lot less when employers are mandated to offer employees coverage, and individuals are mandated.-- individuals are mandated to have coverage. this should go a long way towards reducing medical bill- caused bankruptcies. there is nothing in the bill that would p
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